• North Wales

    North Wales has a maritime history second to none and its historical connections are well documented, so too are the marine facilities that are available today which appeal to many thousands who travel to the area.

  • Sailing and Water Sports

    With hundreds of miles of picturesque coastline (much of it within areas of natural beauty) consisting of majestic cliffs with rocky inlets, sandy beaches, magical islands deep water bays and harbours all providing marine enthusiasts with the ultimate location for all water sports.  Enthusiasts can water ski along the river Conwy into the Snowdonia National Park from the marinas of Conwy and Deganwy whilst yachts and power boats can travel out of the Conwy estuary to the delightful Anglesey coastline or perhaps a circuit of Puffin Island and then into the stunning Menai Strait passing Bangor’s Victorian pier and Port Penrhyn, home for generations to the internationally known Dickie’s boatyard.

    Beyond the spectacular crossings of the Menai suspension bridge and the Britannia road and rail bridges is the marina of Port Dinorwic and beyond this the sailingschoolofPlan Menai. A little further and the welcoming sights of Caernarfon’s marina come into sight located within the historical Royal castle town itself.  Sailing conditions within theMenaiStraitare so perfect that it is home to many races throughout the year culminating in August with the hugely popularMenaiStraitregattas. A further jewel in the sailing crown of this area is the deep water harbour and marina of Holyhead available at all stages of tide and the perfect departure point to join our Irish friends in Dun Laoghaire or perhaps Dublin itself.

    The Lleyn peninsular provides delightful and picturesque bays and anchorages so numerous that even in high season and in perfect conditions you could well expect to be the only one at anchor.  The same could not be said of ever popular Abersoch with its always friendly sailing club, its delightful bay and a whole range of marine facilities where summer days are to be shared with many fellow sailors. A short tack along the coast at this point provides access to the nationally known marina of Pwllheli, again set within the town and home to many sailing events.  Venturing further east will bring you to the historicportofPorthmadog(made famous during the heyday of the slate industry) and the perfect location for visiting Portmeirion’s Italianate village or perhaps venturing out on one of North Wales’ narrow gauge steam railways.

  • Inland Activities

    But this is only a part of the story.  For days ashore there is the Snowdonia national park to explore with fifteen peaks that are over 3,000 ft, including Snowdon at 3,560 ft, the highest inEnglandandWales. Set between the peaks are tranquil lakes, perfect for picnics, camping or kayaking. For golf enthusiasts there are numerous courses, some that will test the lowest of handicaps, and for mountain biking there are miles upon miles of forest trails.

    Rich in history, culture and tradition with a tapestry of stunning countryside surrounded by an outstanding coastline it is not surprising that the area became extremely popular with Victorian visitors. The resort of Llandudno with its carefully maintained pier is tantamount to this and whilst yesterday’s visitor probably had a degree of difficulty in getting around today the A55 expressway connects easily and quickly to the national motorway network and fast trains can reach London in less than three hours.

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